Pinnacle of a Hike

Our ladies hiking group returned to explore the Pinnacles National Park up, down, and sideways. The park is actually half a volcano which the San Andreas fault pushed northward. The other half was left 195 miles south in Lancaster, which is just north of L.A.
Pinnacles High Peaks Wall

The trail winds through the Bear Gulch Caves at the base of the rock formation. Mercifully, no bears — or bats! Just a trickle of an underground stream inhabits the cave. With several twists, turns, and shimmies, one has plenty of time in the cave to wonder what is the attraction to crawling under the rocks at the base of a volcano on an active fault line…
Bear Gulch Cave at Pinnacles National Park

The antidote to the claustrophobia of the caves is the calm peace of the reservoir on the other side.
Reservoir at Pinnacles National Park

Soon enough, the trail turns upwards.
Climbing the Pinnacles

Rails installed by 1930’s Civilian Conservation Corp help us scale the walls. Nice to get over 70 years of use from that government-sponsored work program. (photo by our fearless leader.)
lineup_by_kathy

The reward includes sweeping views of the northern California landscape. You can see the faint thread of a dirt trail in the distance. Soon that dust will be on our boots as we begin the long road home.
long road home from pinnacles

Ski Gear Favs

Back Side of KeystoneIn two ski trips to Colorado and one to Tahoe, my camera rarely made it out of my pocket. This one is from a way backside run at Keystone.

Instead of photos, let me mark the trips with a short report on some of my favorite gear.

Top of my list in terms of keeping me safe is my helmet. It is comfortable and warm. I wouldn’t ski without it.

From now on, a helmet will be worn any time ski boots are on my feet due to the embarrassing fact that my worst fall of the season took place in the ladies room at lodge at the base of the Birds of Prey lift at Beaver Creek.

I keep a second helmet in Colorado so that it doesn’t get bashed by the airlines.

Top of the list in terms of interest from ski lift companions is my smartphone dry bag. I keep the lanyard clipped inside my jacket pocket. In a pinch, I can operate the phone right through the bag. Mostly I slide it out for use.

Pros: Keeps the phone dry and attached to me.
Cons: No headset jack. Break-away lanyard may be fine for wearing about the neck. For my uses attached to my coat pocket, I had to tie it together more firmly.


SmartWool PhD Ski Socks are a must-have for a great day of skiing. Yes, its crazy to spend that much on socks. But it’s less than custom boots.

Jackie_Heavenly_CA_Trail
I love my new ski coat. One of my favorite things about the jacket is the slim pocket on the left arm. Great for holding my ski pass! Not so good for holding reading glasses as the glasses snapped and if you look close at the pic above it looks like my arm bone snapped too!

Rainy Days

(Enjoying a March rain from indoors today and catching up on a little blogging.)

Very little rain this year in California, yet one of the storms came on the day of the Walkie Talkie Ladies expedition to Pinnacles.raindrops_at_pinnacles
Bring on the rain gear!
pinnacles_group_photo
At least the wet brought out the fall colors. (photo by Dr. Marilyn J. August)
Pinnacles color _byMarilynAugust
But we thought better of scrambling over wet rocks…
wet_rocks_pinnacles
…and will wait until spring to scale the High Peaks (photo by our fearless hike leader).
pinnacles_high_peaks

Rabies Shots!

Rabies Vaccine for Humans
Maybe this is why rabies vaccine for humans gets a bad name: the nurse comes and dumps an armload of needles on the tray. Sorry for the blurring photo but i think my hands were shaking.

It turns out to be not as bad as the urban legend. Seven shots yes, but not long needles in the stomach. It seems they want to inject into muscle tissue and, I’m sad to report, there is little of that in my abdomen area. So two sticks in each thigh, one in each arm, and one more in the butt for good measure. I have 3 more follow-up visits and it’s done!

This whole thing came about because this little guy zoomed into my RV up at a campground in Tahoe.
Rabid Bat
I didn’t know it at first. I thought the silent dark glider that went in the open window was a moth. Other people said it was a bird. I left the windows open a good time, didn’t see anything when i looked around, and forgot about it.
Next day the poor sick bat was lamely trying to get out the “kitchen window”. I left quietly, shutting the camper door behind me. Left my phone inside though. D’oh!

Many thanks to the animal control office who caught the bat and brought it in for testing. Unfortunately, it came back positive for rabies.

Since we both spent the night in the bat cave, the health department recommended vaccine for me. Here is the bat cave above the cab:
bat cave
And my rented “batmobile”:
RV
Before the health department caught up to me, I had researched the bat as my Native American totem. Various web pages said the bat was viewed as a source of intuition and a symbol of rebirth.

In a shamanic culture, my brush with the bat might be regarded as good fortune and an opportunity to see more of the world beyond this one. So what if it ended in madness and death. We all die anyway.

Being of this culture, and not at all ready to step through the doorway to the next world, I took the shots and (I hope) shut down the possibility of any altered bat states.

Right now, I’m just hoping my superpower will be immunity to rabies.

South Tahoe Burn Hike

Spent an active afternoon hiking around Van Sickle Bi-State park in the South Lake Tahoe area. If you’re wondering what a Van Sickle is, its the generous family that donated the land for this park.

This park is unusual because its right on the border between California and Nevada — the only bi-state park in the country!

We hiked up the burn area. Some fool threw a cigarette from the Heavenly ski gondola and it burned hundreds of acres.

Fabulous views of the lake!

Eventually, the time came to declare victory and head down the mountain.

View of Google from the Weeds

On a recent hike around Shoreline, caught a view of Google HQ from the weeds:

View Of Google from the WeedsOf course the Google-plex has its share of parking lots, but maybe more interesting is the alternate transportation.  Over the hill lounge the shuttle buses, waiting to take the Googlers home.

google bus playgroundFurther down the bay are the NASA blimp hangers, in process of restoration by Google execs in exchange for parking spots for their personal jets.

blimp hangers

 

 

Beaver Creek Gently

Jackie on Beaver Creek Strawberry liftThis year’s Beaver Creek trip was tamer than usual as I am recovering from injury.  In fact, it wound up being as much swimming as skiing:

pool

So rather than ski the mega-steeps, I got to photograph them from afar.   Here is The Brink – the steep run on the top right – a favorite from last year.

Birds of Prey at Beaver Creek

Its was tough (sarc):  11 inches of new snow on my birthday and I had to ski green groomers.   At least the cake was good!

Cake at Beaver Creek

Let the Winter Fun Begin!

Winter fun in Summit County Colorado!  As we watched from the living room window over the course of a week, Lake Dillon froze.  (We also got out for a little skiing.)